New patient- Welcome

imgs-3

Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to destroy cancer cells. Normal cells grow and die in a controlled way. When cancer occurs, cells in the body that are not normal keep dividing and forming more cells without control. Chemotherapy drugs destroy cancer cells by stopping them from growing or multiplying. Healthy cells can also be harmed, especially those that divide quickly. Harm to healthy cells is what causes side effects. These cells usually repair themselves after chemotherapy. Because some drugs work better together than alone, two or more drugs are often given at the same time. This is called combination chemotherapy.

For more detailed information, please refer to our guide on the side effects of chemotherapy.

Request an appointment

Praesent eget tortor aliquam, laoreet dui gravida, varius erat. Aliquam eget enim eu purus cursus vestibulum eu non arcu lorem.

Send messageclear

Core department services

A cancer diagnosis usually leads to a mountain of questions. We strive to reduce your anxiety and bring peace of mind by offering immediate answers to more common questions regarding our office procedures and treatment methods. If your questions are not answered here, or you would like to discuss your concerns, you can always call our offices to speak to our staff or your doctor directly.

What Causes Side Effects?

Normal cells grow and die in a controlled way. When cancer occurs, cells in the body that are not normal keep dividing and forming more cells without control. Chemotherapy, or anticancer, drugs destroy cancer cells by stopping them from growing or multiplying. Healthy cells can also be harmed, especially those that divide quickly. Harm to healthy cells is what causes side effects.

The fast-growing, normal cells most likely to be affected are blood cells forming in the bone marrow and cells in the digestive tract (mouth, stomach, intestines, esophagus), reproductive system (sexual organs), and hair follicles. Some anticancer drugs may affect cells of vital organs, such as the heart, kidney, bladder, lungs, and nervous system. You may have none of these side effects or just a few.

The kinds of side effects you have and how severe they are, depend on the type and dose of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Before starting chemotherapy, your doctor will discuss the side effects that you are most likely to experience with the drugs you will be receiving. Before starting the treatment, you will be asked to sign a consent form. You should be given all the facts about treatment including the drugs you will be given and their side effects before you sign the consent form.

* Source material from the National Cancer Institute.

What will I have to pay at my appointment time?

Your insurance will be billed, but you will be responsible for any deductible or co-payment due at your appointment. For your convenience we accept Visa and MasterCard.

Will I still need to see my primary care physician?

We recommend that you continue to see your primary care physician.

Do I need a referral or a diagnosis?

You don’t need a referral or a cancer diagnosis to schedule a visit. Although cancer is usually first suspected or detected by primary care physicians, our doctors can make a diagnosis if you suspect you may have cancer or would like a second opinion.

Please remember that some insurance companies require that you have a referral from your primary care (or other) physician before seeing a specialist. If your insurance company requires this, please make sure that your other doctor has provided a referral before scheduling your first appointment.